2 Signs Your Swimming Pool Has A Leak

3 September 2015
 Categories: , Blog


Does your swimming pool seem a little off? Although you might chalk up those issues to simple neglect on your part, microscopic fractures might be letting water gush out of your pool underground. Here are two signs your swimming pool has a leak, and why it matters:

1: Chemical Levels That Are Difficult to Control

Do you feel like you are constantly adjusting swimming pool chemicals? If your pool liner has a leak, it could be letting chemicals seep into the surrounding soil, wasting expensive additives. Here are a few signs your swimming pool chemistry is off:

  • Cloudy Water: Healthy pool water should be crystal clear. If your water looks cloudy, it might mean that dirt or grime is entering your pool through liner cracks. If water is allowed to escape, it can also concentrate existing pool chemicals, raising the pH and causing cloudy water. 
  • Skin or Eye Irritation: High water pH can also cause painful skin and eye irritation. If swimmers experience problems, check your pool chemistry.

Keep in mind that the pH of your pool water should be between 7.0 and 7.6. If you have trouble maintaining your pool chemistry, visually inspect the interior for cracks and leaks.

2: Wet Areas Around the Pool

Unfortunately, liner cracks can interfere with more than just your pool water. When liquid is allowed to gush out of your pool, it can also create problems in these areas:

  • Damaged Concrete or Tile: Escaping water can seep into surrounding tile grout and concrete, where it can expand and contract. Over time, this movement can cause large cracks, loose tile, and flaky bricks. In addition to looking terrible, damaged hardscapes can also create trip and fall hazards for your family and friends. Instead of simply fixing the tile or concrete, look for liner cracks that could be contributing to the excess moisture.
  • Marshy Landscaping: Pool cracks can also make the landscaping around your pool marshy and difficult to keep alive. Pay attention to struggling plants, muddy grass, or overgrown ground covers. If you notice issues, it might signal an underground flood.

Although small swimming pool leaks can be patched with DIY repair kits, don't attempt to repair larger leaks on your own. Instead, hire a professional pool contractor (such as Budget Pool & Spa Tech Inc.) who can use special cameras or pressurized air to quickly detect leaks and resolve problems. Professional leak detection typically starts at around $150, but it might keep your pool area from deteriorating before your eyes.


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